Sunday, July 10, 2016

Max, 93

The listening ear project Max

MAX, 93

My dad was a farmer and a carpenter. He’d done about everything. He kept us busy. I always worked hard because it was just the thing to do, I guess.


Maxine (Max’s daughter): He’s always worked. He worked up until the day he had his stroke two months ago. He has a great work ethic. I just don’t remember him ever missing work. He had to be on his deathbed to miss it. Even when he was in the hospital with his stroke he said, “will you call work and tell them I can’t be there?” 

It really isn’t the same today, because I don’t think people have to depend on it for their livelihood. They’re just not as committed, you know? It’s kind of just all about me and not about everyone else. Max had a sense of responsibility to his boss and to all of the rest of the guys in the shop. If he wasn’t there, they had to pick up his work and he’s not that kind of guy. He took pride in the fact that when he said he was going to do something, he did! 


When he had his stroke, we had him in therapy for three weeks. The therapist said, this guy’s a worker! That’s why he’s getting better. He works at it. If he makes a commitment to do something, he does it. He said, I have people that come down to therapy and sleep. They don’t want to work. We had little boxing gloves for him so he could box in rehab and a lot of them were saying, “I can’t keep up with him!” So the therapists still come and they box every time. He’s quite a guy.

World War II funeral
 Max De St. Jeor, 93

During World War II, I was an aircraft mechanic stationed in England at the Base Air Depot. I worked in California before that, at Douglas Aircraft. I had three brothers serving in the war at the same time. I had two brothers in the Navy and my oldest brother got killed on Anthill beach in Anzio, Italy. He was in the infantry. 

We had a B-24 crash right next to a school, it was a little grade school. 36 kids were killed and it went right through a cafe at lunch time. It was called the Freckleton Disaster. I was on the scene as part of the rescue mission. We packed all the little kids on our shoulders to the cemetery. They had a mass burial and funeral for them. They had guys packing each child. In fact, one guy who had carried this little girl, when he got back home, he had a little girl and he named her after this girl. She got to go back and meet the mother of the little girl when we went back in 95’ for a reunion. It’s kind of a sad story. They don’t know for sure what caused it. They don’t know whether it was lighting or thunder, he’d come in just before a storm.

Maxine (Max’s daughter): He’s been very patriotic over the years. He’s always been very active in the community. He did the veteran crosses for the Orem cemetery for 30 years or longer. He’s still BFW commander in Orem and he has been for the last 40 years. That’s how we spent Memorial Day as a family for many years — putting crosses up at the Orem cemetery for the Veterans, and dad would make them all. He would cut them all and put their name plates on. He has been extremely patriotic when it comes to appreciation for his country and the sacrifices that were made. He’s done more than his share. Pt 2

Photo: "The U.S. 8th Air Force at Warton 1942-1945: The World's Greatest Air Depot." By: Harry Holmes

Old man wearing his boxing globes and sharing his story at the listening ear project


I was a Golden Gloves boxer. I was too little to play football or, you know, so they decided that was the best thing for me to do. I boxed all through high school and then when I went into the service, I did a little of it. I was a trainer at a boxing gym nearby and my son got into it. I have a picture of me and my son with Danny Lopez, he was a world champion originally from Orem. 

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